HomeContact UsTwitterFacebookSkype
Today is 06 December 2020    

Our Clients & Experiences
Complete solutions offerings that will guide the evolution of your business



 
 

> PUBLIC TRAINING & CERTIFICATION PROGRAM 2009 [ 1,397 kBs ]
> Registrationand PaymentForm [ 388 kBs ]
> B-Excellence Interactive Brochure [ 817 kBs ]
> B-Excellence Full Brochure-Printable Version [ 1,460 kBs ]
> 40-Inventive Principles - General [ 1,276 kBs ]
> Extending the Enterprise through Lean Thinking and Value Chain Engineering [ 23 kBs ]
> Lean Manufacturing and the Toyota Production System [ 50 kBs ]
> Lean thinking for Competitive Advantage [ 41 kBs ]
> Role of Management in a Lean Manufacturing Environment [ 31 kBs ]
> SIX SIGMA FOR MANUFACTURING AND NON-MANUFACTURING [ 665 kBs ]
> Six Sigma healthcare [ 84 kBs ]
> Systematic Innovation Using TRIZ [ 503 kBs ]
> The Six Sigma Revolution [ 123 kBs ]
> TOC and TRIZ Using A Dual-Methodological Approach To Solve A Forest Harvesting Problem. [ 339 kBs ]
> TRIZ as a Lean Thinking Tool [ 115 kBs ]
> Triz at a Bank [ 299 kBs ]


 



There are two groups of problems people face: those with generally known solutions and those with unknown solutions. Those with known solutions can usually be solved by information found in books, technical journals, or with subject matter experts. The other type is called an inventive problem.

New
Knowledge
 

New knowledge applied to known problems.

Example: Replace metal by plastic.

 

New knowledge applied to new problems.

Example: Uses laser in CDROM

Existing
Knowledge
 

Existing knowledge applied to known problems.

Example: All tasks with known solutions.

 

Existing knowledge does not provide solution.

We are dealing with an inventive problem

    Known Problem   New Problem

     An inventive problem is a problem that involves one or more contradictions. A contradiction is a situation where an attempt to improve one feature of the system leads to the degradation of another feature.
Examples:
     • When the strength of a mechanical object is increased, its weight increases as well.
     • A pen tip should be sharp to draw legible lines, but blunt to avoid tearing the paper.
     • Aircraft landing gear is necessary for takeoff and landing, but is undesirable during flight.
     The conventional way to deal with a contradiction is to look for a compromise or trade-off - however, there are many examples of solutions that resolve contradictions. This means that methods for satisfying contradictory requirements exist and can be exploited.

> TRIZ origins
> What is an Inventive Problem?
> Levels of Invention
> Problem Solving Model
> B-Excellence Partnership
> TRIZ for Business and Management
> 40 Inventive Principles
> Contradiction Matrix
> TRIZ Examples
> Patent Analysis Services

<< BackTOP
Home | Quality Excellence | Manufacturing Excellence | Enterprise Excellence | Innovation Excellence | Download | Contact Us
Copyright © 2006 - 2020 B-Excellence Co., Ltd. All rights reserved.® Powered by webUB.COM